A New Perspective

Reyes Vera joined Trellis earlier this Winter as the Education Director of the Trellis School. We recently sat down to ask him three questions to get to know him a little better. Read his bio on our Leadership Page and read below for the answers to our questions.

Q. What attracted you to Trellis?

Trellis has always been known for having high quality educational and clinical programs. As a BCBA and special educator, being part of a school that utilizes the principles of ABA and Verbal Behavior was very appealing to me. I am very excited to be a member of the Trellis team.

Q. What’s your vision for your role as Education Director?

Trellis is a well-established program. I want to contribute to the program to build on what is already in place. I see myself promoting professional growth within Trellis and providing families support to further the generalization of skills from school to home and community.

Q. What are 5 things you want parents to know about Trellis?

  1. The students are always engaged! The Trellis team is amazing at creating instructional opportunities throughout the school day.
  2. The Trellis team sets high realistic expectations for their students.
  3.  The Trellis team is passionate about their work with the students.
  4.  The Trellis team is dedicated to professional growth. We have multiple staff enrolling in programs to gain their BCBA certification.
  5.  The instructors, teachers, related services, administration, and families all work together to achieve a common goal…student success!

A Letter from a Trellis Parent

Trellis means home to me…

I remember the first day I came into visit the school, two months after Max was diagnosed with Autism. For the two months before walking through the Trellis doors, I felt lost and, honestly, sad every time I met with an ASD service provider. The approach was “we know best” and “your son has this laundry list of limitations” … as a result my expectations were low and actually misguided.

When I walked through the door of Trellis, children were laughing, teachers were smiling. It was a school not a “treatment center”. I was asked all about Max and said “he sounds great” and I felt proud of Max for the first time after his diagnosis. I will never forget that moment. I have never stopped feeling proud of Max since then.

Thank you. All of you. Thank you for ignoring behaviors, counting and manding, working patiently when Max’s sensory needs carry him away and make him unavailable for a while and even taking a right hook or two.

Today, Max is soaring – he is talking. Yes talking. At one point in time, that was not clear he would talk. You all did that. You pushed him. You coached me and you never, never, never gave up on us. Max’s behaviors are manageable. Before Trellis, Max had broken my nose, and more things at home than I care to remember. Now he says “no” when he is unhappy at home. If he has behaviors, I know the ABCs and can manage them along with the latest protocol that we are generalizing at home. You did that. You implemented the protocol. You coached me and you never, never, never gave up on us.

When you are the parent of a kid on the spectrum you feel like you are either fighting or apologizing with everyone in your child’s path. When Max started at Trellis, for the first time that feeling changed. Now I feel like I have a team of people in my corner. From the front desk, the program managers, Occupational Therapists, Speech Pathologists and Instructors on our team.

At the end of the day, Trellis means home to us. Max is known and loved for his whole self. You accept him for who he is and at the same time push him to reach his potential. Thank you for teaching my son with love and respect. You will never know what you mean to Max and me. He and all of the children you serve will reach their potential thanks to you.

– Audra Jones

Creating a Great Halloween

Halloween is just a few short weeks away. As we prepare for the decorations and fun activities to come, now is the time to consider some ways you can help your child to have a happy and fun Halloween experience.

PRACTICE
Know the route you plan to take on Halloween and practice the walk with your child before Halloween. Consider taking about 3 practice walks beginning 1 week before and leading up to the big day.

ROLE PLAY
Let your child play out the scenario of trick or treating by walking up to a door, ringing the doorbell. Enlist a friendly neighbor to help you act it out, or practice at your own front door. Give candy! If you give them an actual piece of candy they will be way more excited about what is in store.

CHOOSE CAREFULLY
There are so many fun and creative costumes to choose from but be cautious about getting anything that may irritate your child, particularly sensitive areas around the ears, eyes or throat.

HAVE A BACK UP PLAN
Stay flexible on the day. If your child is not up for the outing, have a back-up plan that includes fun indoor activities.

Click here for more great resources from our friends at Pathfinders for Autism.